Home » culture » The Decline of the Rest.

The Decline of the Rest.

200px-decline_of_the_west_1922Oswald Spengler published the first volume of his two-volume life’s work, The Decline of the West, in 1918. Seventy-four years later, speaking at the Earth Summit, Rio de Janeiro in 1992, 41st US President George HW Bush, a decent man, declared, “The American way of life is not up for negotiation. Period.” This pre-emptive declaration by the leader of the world’s most powerful nation essentially castrated the noble intentions of the summit, to limit humankind’s exploitation of the earth’s resources to sustainable levels. The result of the Rio summit was Agenda 21, a non-binding, voluntarily implemented action plan for the 21st century. This was the paltry outcome of a nine-day meeting representing 172 countries attended by 116 heads of state, 2400 NGOs and 17,000 other representatives of indigenous peoples and ordinary ‘you and me’ types.

Twenty-one years after the US President’s declaration in Rio, the WWF designated the 20th of August 2013 as “Earth Overshoot Day;” the day that humanity has used as much renewable natural resources as the planet can regenerate in one year. In 2016, Earth Overshoot Day is estimated to have fallen on August 8th, after which date we’re drawing down the planet’s renewable resources for the rest of the year. Pity the poor planet! The American way of life is still not up for negotiation, and the rest of the world is rushing to catch up. If ever populous countries like China and India get there, the planet will be sucked dry and we’ll all have to follow Elon Musk to Mars! So are we condemned to a two-track planet where some countries (or some sections of society within countries) corner material resources and the rest go a-begging? This is the scenario being projected by right wing demagogues worldwide and this is the reason for their recent successes at the ballot box.

Economists and philosophers have tried to redefine human well-being to reflect planetary limits, most notably in recent years by Tim Jackson’s book Prosperity without Growth, which acknowledges that the current definition of economic success is fundamentally flawed. Prosperous societies today increasingly recognize that increased material wealth does not increase well-being. However, most people the world over, regardless of their economic condition, still aspire to some version of the American way of life. This  aspiration is reflected in the respect automatically accorded to wealthy people in the world today. A look at the Who’s Who of practically any country includes the names of its wealthiest citizens, together with lists of eminent physicians, lawyers, sportspeople and so on.

Gandhi pithily articulated this state of affairs decades ago when he said: The world has enough for every man’s need but not for every man’s greed. For each according to her needs would be the ideal but, as always, messy reality intervenes. One man’s need is another man’s greed. So it is that millions of well-meaning, virtuous, affluent people the world over would never dream of giving up hard-won creature comforts for the sake of other planetary denizens who are less well off. The spiral of technology has historically been to continuously improve human life, and to continuously create problems at the same time. These problems in turn needed infusions of new technology to solve its problems. So right now, the choices seem to be to outer-planetary colonization, or to invest in defences (gated communities, wealthy enclaves, security guards, border walls) to hold on to material gains. Technology offers a third alternative. The idea of a sharing economy has recently gained a lot of traction. Who needs ownership when mobility and services are seamlessly available? Indeed, ownership becomes a bit of a burden in comparison to the convenience of superb services available on demand with little or no delay.

A gated community safely behind bars

A gated community safely behind bars

Even if all this is achieved, humankind’s basic inner restlessness will ensure that we keep wanting more and better, with one eye on the people next door. Global contentment is a moving target. Enter mystic and philosopher Sadhguru and his lectures on inner engineering. His most memorable anecdote in the video (begins at minute 16) is a reminder that all is not lost in the midst of this doom and gloom if we can take the time to laugh at ourselves and the posturings that have brought us to this point.

Sadhguru, irreverent teacher

Sadhguru, irreverent mystic

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3 Comments

  1. Chuck Burton says:

    To characterize George H W Bush as a decent man is to turn a blind eye to a host of horrific crimes. The father’s image has only been slightly rehabilitated by the excesses of his son. Bush Sr. murdered a minimum of 1,000 poor Panamanians in the city slums in December 1989, because the CIA was feuding with President Noriega after he turned his back on their mutual criminal dealings. There was no other rationale for the bombing and incursion. Bush was CIA director for many other war crimes in Central America and was deeply involved in the illegal Contra/Iran nexus and its blowback of flooding American ghettos with illicit drugs. In order to defeat Carter, Bush was tasked with cutting a deal with the Iranians to make sure the hostages stayed prisoners in Teheran, only to be released on the day of Reagan’s inauguration. This action detailed in Gary Sick’s October Surprise is a textbook example of high treason. Prescott Bush was a Nazi collaborator and both his son and grandson war criminals. Thank you.

    • aviottjohn says:

      Thanks for the reply and the information Chuck. So Bush Sr. had no saving graces? Sorry to hear that. On a recent trip to Cambodia, I was horrified to learn that under Nixon and Kissinger, more bombs were dropped on tiny, neutral Cambodia than were used in the entire WW II. The litany goes on…

      • Chuck Burton says:

        Everyone has saving graces, maybe even Herr Drumpf. Well everyone but Dick Cheney. Bush 41 had his good moments, but not enough to make up for his very black ones. All the best.

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